jupiter badge: name and stats
Chart of relative sizes of planets
Physical Orbital
constellations seen in the northern hemisphere
constellations seen in the southern hemisphere
Jupiter and the Galilean Satellites

You can see the Galilean satellites of Jupiter and the rings of Saturn using powerful binoculars or a small telescope. Since the Galilean satellites orbit relatively fast around the planet, you can track their movement. Saturn's rings are spectacular for observation. However, keep in mind that they disappear from time to time. Since we see them from the side and the Earth changes it position in respect to Saturn, the rings could be widely open or totally invisible if they are exactly in profile. This is because they are large, but very thin.

comet

Most new comets are discovered by amateur astronomers and are named after them. A good practice for comet hunting is to scan the horizon after the sunset and before dawn. You will need a lot of patience. Otherwise, simply check the Internet to find out if and when there will be comets passing through. Once you know when and where to look, they can be fairly simple to find.

meteor shower

Sometimes young comets produce meteor showers. This happens when the Earth passes trough a cloud of comet dust. During such an event there are hundreds and thousands of meteors per hour, like a rain of shooting stars.

Ursa Major

A constellation in the northern sky also known as the Little Bear. Ursa Major is the location of the Big Dipper.

Ursa Minor

A constellation in the northern sky also known as the Little Bear. The star at the end of it's "tail" is Polaris, the north pole star.

Cassiopeia

A constellation in the northern sky and home of the Ρ Cas (Rho Cassiopeiae) and V509 Cas yellow hypergiant stars.

Orion

One of the most well-known constellations in the sky, Orion is home to the stars Betelgeuse and Rigel, as well as M42 -- the Orion Nebula.

Taurus

One of the constellations of the zodiac, and home to the red giant star, Aldebaran.

Canis Major

A constellation which is home to Sirius, the brightest star in the sky.

Leo

One of the zodiac constellations and home to the stars Regulus, Denebola and Algieba.

Virgo

One of the zodiac constellations and home of the stars Spica, Zavijava and Porrima.

Gemini

One of the zodiac constellations and home to the stars Castor and Pollux.

Bootes

A constellation in the northern sky, containing the third brightest star in the sky, Arcturus.

Lyra

A constellation visible in the northern hemisphere and home to the stars Vega and Sheliak.

Cygnus

Also known as the Northern Cross, Cygnus is a constellation visible in the northern hemisphere during the summer and autumn months. The blue supergiant Deneb is its biggest star.

Aquila

A constellation which lies just a few degrees north of the celestial equator. It's alpha star, Altair, is an A-type main sequence star.

Pegasus

A constellation in the northern sky and home to the stars Markab and Scheat. It is also home to 51 Pegasi, the first star outside of our own to have been found to have a planet orbiting it.

Andromeda

A constellation visible in the northern sky and home to M31, the Andromeda Galaxy.

Perseus

A constellation visible in the northern sky, it is the home of the stars Algol and Mirfak and the location in the sky of the Perseids meteor shower.

nucleus

The center of a comet, usually made up of rock and frozen gases.

coma

The weak atmosphere surrounding the nucleus of a comet.

Perseids

The meteor shower associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids are visible from mid-July to mid-August every year.

Quadrantids

A January meteor shower best viewed in nothernmost latitudes.

Eta-Aquariids

The meteor shower associated with Halley's Comet and visible from April to May each year.

Geminids

A meteor shower associated withe the asteroid 3200 Phaethonand visible every December.